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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Greek treatise on the sublime found in the catalog.

Greek treatise on the sublime

W. Rhys Roberts

Greek treatise on the sublime

its modern interest

by W. Rhys Roberts

  • 7 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by [Richard Clay and Sons, limited] in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Longinus -- Criticism and interpretation.,
  • Greek literature -- History and criticism.,
  • Greek language -- Style.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementbyW. Rhys Roberts.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp.176-188 ;
    Number of Pages188
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18475605M

    Treatise commonly attributed to Longinus but probably the work of an unknown writer of the 1st century A.D. Preview this book» What people are saying - Write a review. Longinus (/ l ɒ n ˈ dʒ aɪ n ə s /; Ancient Greek: Λογγῖνος Longĩnos) is the conventional name of the author of the treatise On the Sublime (Περὶ ὕψους Perì hýpsous), a work which focuses on the effect of good writing. Longinus, sometimes referred to as Pseudo-Longinus because his real name is unknown, was a Greek teacher of rhetoric or a literary critic who may have.

      On the Sublime (Greek Peri hypsous) Treatise on literary criticism by Longinus, dating to about the 1st century AD. The earliest surviving manuscript, from the 10th century, was first printed in On the Sublime is given a 1st-century-AD date because it was a response to a work of that period by Caecilius of Calacte, a Sicilian rhetorician. "In this book, Robert Doran offers the first in-depth treatment of the major theories of the sublime, from the ancient Greek treatise On the Sublime (attributed to 'Longinus') and its reception in early modern literary theory to the philosophical accounts of Burke and Kant.

    Little is known about Longinus (pronounced “londjainus”), the author of the treatise On the Sublime. For a long time the text was attributed to Cassius Longinus (3 rd century). However, most critics now accept that Longinus wrote his work in the first century AD. The . An ancient Greek treatise by Longinus is the first important study of the sublime. Longinus was interested in rhetoric — the science of argument and persuasion. He claims that an orator can overwhelm his audience through the use of high, lofty or grand language, and, in doing so, enable the audience to transcend their ordinary logical thought.


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Greek treatise on the sublime by W. Rhys Roberts Download PDF EPUB FB2

On the Sublime (Greek: Περì Ὕψους Perì Hýpsous; Latin: De sublimitate) is a Roman-era Greek work of literary criticism dated to the 1st century AD. Its author is unknown, but is conventionally referred to as Longinus (/ l ɒ n ˈ dʒ aɪ n ə s /; Ancient Greek: Λογγῖνος Longĩnos) or is regarded as a classic work on aesthetics and the effects of good.

The author of On the Sublime, who almost certainly was not Longinus, but instead was an anonymous Greek rhetorician of the first century, argues throughout the work that it is a writer’s genius. THE GREEK TREATISE ON THE SUBLIME.

plicated discussion, I will now set forth, as impartially as may be, and under the headings already indicated, the considerations which may be advanced on the one side and on the other. AEXTERNAL E VIDENCE. (a) NEGATIVE.

It is a remarkable fact that the Treatise. In this book, Robert Doran offers the first in-depth treatment of the major theories of the sublime, from the ancient Greek treatise On the Sublime (attributed to 'Longinus') and its reception in early modern literary theory to the philosophical accounts of Burke and by:   Introduction.

Longinus is the conventional name of the author of the treatise, On the Sublime (Περὶ ὕψους), a work which focuses on the effect of good writing (Russell xlii). Longinus, sometimes referred to as pseudo-Longinus because his real name is unknown, was a Greek teacher of rhetoric or a literary critic who may have lived in the first or third century AD.

On the Sublime, Greek Peri hypsous, treatise on literary criticism by Longinus, dating to about the 1st century earliest surviving manuscript, from the 10th century, was first printed in On the Sublime is given a 1st-century-ce date because it was a response to a work of that period by Caecilius of Calacte, a Sicilian contains 17 chapters on figures of speech, which.

THE GREEK TREATISE ON THE SUBLIME. His answer is, that, though elevation of tone is innate, yet art can regulate the use of natural gifts. It is, he says, with diction as with life. A man favoured by fortune ought to know how to use his advantages; a writer of genius ought to profit by the help of art.

In order to show that a systematic. This is a classical text on aesthetics and proper style in writing and rhetoric, including commentary on various ancient Greek works such as those of Plato, Homer, and Demosthenes.

Authorship of this treatise is disputed/unknown, but the text is traditionally attributed to Longinus or Pseudo-Longinus.

Introduction by Andrew Lang. (summary by Amelia Chesley, adapted from Wikipedia). Excerpt from Dionysius Longinus on the Sublime: Translated From the Greek With Notes and Observations, and Some Account of the Life, Writings, and Character of the Author It will, without doubt, be expected, that the Reader should be made privy to the reasons upon which this Work was under taken, and is now made public.

Start by marking “The Works of Dionysius Longinus, on the Sublime: Or, a Treatise Concerning the Sovereign Perfection of Writing.

Translated from the Greek. with Some Remarks on the English Poets. by Mr. Welsted.” as Want to Read/5(44). Boileau, in his introduction to his version of the ancient Treatise on the Sublime, says that he is making no valueless present to his age.

Not valueless, to a generation which talks much about style and method in literature, should be this new rendering of the noble fragment, long attributed to Longinus, the Greek tutor and political adviser. On the Sublime includes works by roughly fifty authors including Homer, the famed blind poet of Ancient Greek culture.

Longinus also mentions Genesis, a book in Hebrew Bible. Because of this, many have assumed that Longinus was either knowledgeable about Jewish culture, or possbly even a Hellenized (Greek.

Plutarch tells a story illustrative of his arrogance. Being asked by the Seleucians to open a school of rhetoric, he replied, "A dish is not large enough for a dolphin" ((Greek characters)), v. Luculli, c. 22, quoted by Pearce.

Aristeas. —A name involved in a mist of fable. In this book, Robert Doran offers the first in-depth treatment of the major theories of the sublime, from the ancient Greek treatise On the Sublime (attributed to 'Longinus') and its reception in early modern literary theory to the philosophical accounts of Burke and Kant.

This is a classical text on aesthetics and proper style in writing and rhetoric, including commentary on various ancient Greek works such as those of Plato, Homer, and Demosthenes.

Authorship of this treatise is disputed/unknown, but the text is traditionally attributed to Longinus or Pseudo-Longinus.

Appendix: I. Specimen passages translated from Greek writers of the Roman empire on literary criticismII. The treatise On sublimity and Latin criticsIII. Passages translated from Bishop Lowth's Oxford lectures on Hebrew poetryIV.

Additional note on paraphones. Boileau, in his introduction to his version of the ancient Treatise on the Sublime, says that he is making no valueless present to his valueless, to a generation which talks much about style and method in literature, should be this new rendering of the noble fragment, long attributed to Longinus, the Greek tutor and political adviser of Zenobia.

The sublime has a long history, dating back to the first century C.E. when the Greek critic Longinus first presented his concept of the sublime in his aesthetic treatise On Sublime (Peri hypsous). The root word is the Latin sublimis, an amalgamation of “sub” (up to) and “limen” (literally, the top piece of a door).

PSEUDO-LONGINUS°PSEUDO-LONGINUS °, name ascribed to the author of the Greek treatise "On the Sublime." The oldest manuscript of the treatise ascribes it to Dionysius Longinus.

The only Longinus known, however, was named Cassius not Dionysius, and the opening of this manuscript notes the author as "Dionysius or Longinus." The work must therefore be regarded as of uncertain date and authorship.

In this book, Robert Doran offers the first in-depth treatment of the major theories of the sublime, from the ancient Greek treatise On the Sublime and its reception in early modern literary theory to the philosophical accounts of Burke and Kant.

THE THEORY OF THE SUBLIME FROM LONGINUS TO KANT In this book, Robert Doran offers the first in-depth treatment of the majortheories of the sublime, from the ancient Greek treatise On the Sublime(attributedto“Longinus”),anditsreceptioninearlymodern literary theory, to the philosophical accounts of Burke and Kant.of the minister of Queen Zenobia, who was put to death after the fall of Palmyra in a.d.

(Gibbon, ch. xi). Moreover, there are actually some overlaps between On the Sublime and the fragments of Cassius Longinus’ rhetorical treatise (conveniently printed in A.

O. Prickard’s edition of On the Sublime, Oxfordas in many early editions); and the eleventh-century rhetorician John of.Originally published inthis book contains the full Greek text of Longinus on the Sublime, alongside the English translation.

Table of Contents Introduction I: Authorship of the Treatise.